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Brain Research is Getting More Attention

NIH approves high-priority research within BRAIN Initiative Share on emailShare on facebookShare on twitter National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., today approved initial areas of high-priority brain research to guide $40 million of NIH fiscal year 2014 funding within the BRAINBrain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) Initiative. The initiative aims to accelerate work on technologies that give a dynamic picture of how individual cells and complex neural circuits interact. The ultimate goal is to enhance understanding of the brain and improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases. The initiative was announced in April by President Obama . He called for a total of $110 million in the 2014 fiscal year budget to support the effort, of which $40 million is expected to be allocated by NIH. “The time is right to exploit recent advances in neuroscience research and technologies to advance our understanding of the brain’s functions and processes and what causes them to go wrong in disease,” said Dr. Collins. “The BRAIN Working Group has been on a fast track to identify key areas of research for funding. This group of visionary neuroscientists has provided an excellent set of recommendations, and I am eager to move these areas forward.” Generate a census of brain cell types Create structural maps of the brain Develop new, large-scale neural network recording capabilities Develop a suite of tools for neural circuit manipulation Link neuronal activity to behavior Integrate theory, modeling, statistics and computation with neuroscience experiments Delineate mechanisms underlying human brain imaging technologies Create mechanisms to enable collection of human data for scientific research Disseminate knowledge and training Following President Obama’s announcement, Dr. Collins tasked a working group of his Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD) to identify high priority areas of research for fiscal 2014 funding and to develop a long-term scientific plan. The BRAIN Working Group today presented the high priority research areas to the ACD. The ACD fully endorsed the report and recommended that the NIH director accept them in full, which he did. The working group will continue to work over the course of the next eight to nine months to develop the longer term scientific plan, which is expected to be delivered to the ACD in June 2014. The BRAIN Initiative is jointly led by NIH, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the National Science Foundation. Private...

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Why are we still guessing at patient pain?

Do we ask patients to guess at their height? Weight? Pulse? Blood Pressure? O2 Levels? Why are still asking them to guess at pain… Accendowave takes the guesswork out of pain detection and raises the bar for clinical excellence. Pain Assessment  ...

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Play Before Pain Meds!

The National Pharmaceutical Council and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations reports on nonpharmacologic diversion therapies similar to those provided by AccendoWave. In December 2001, the National Pharmaceutical Council as part of a collaboration project with the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations developed a monograph titled Pain: Current Understanding of Assessment, Management, and Treatments.  Section III of said monograph is Types of Treatment.  Paragraph B of Section III is titled Nonpharmacologic Treatments for Pain.  That paragraph states “ Nonpharmacologic strategies should supplement, but not replace, the use of medications.  In addition to supplementing the pain-relieving effects of analgesics, nonpharmacologic approaches offer other advantages.  For Example they can improve mood, reduce anxiety, increase a patient’s sense of control, strengthen coping abilities, assist with sleep, relax muscles and improve the quality of life.” AccendoWave combines several of the Psychological Methods Used to Manage Pain as outlined in Table 30 of said monograph. AccendoWave provides: Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT): CBT combines cognitive therapy techniques (e.g. attention diversion with behavioral techniques (e.g. relaxation and assertiveness training).  CBT helps patients alter their perceptions or labeling of pain, increases sense of control and decreases maladaptive behaviors.   CBT is especially helpful with chronic pain, but can also be useful in acute pain.   Relaxation with imagery: One of the most widely used nonpharmacologic treatments for pain that can increase focus on feelings of well-being as well as diminish tension, anxiety, depression, and pain-related inactivity.  Relaxation imagery is especially helpful with postoperative pain, chronic headache, cancer pain, arthritis pain, and labor pain.   Distraction: Includes repeating reaffirming phrases and playing games to distract attention in patients with chronic noncancer pain.   The goal is for the patient to actively occupy his or her attention with and activity other than pain.   Distraction is used in patients with multiple acute and chronic types of pain.   Biofeedback: Patient learns to take voluntary control over physiological body activities by receiving input about those activities.  Directed at teaching a patient how to take control of body responses via mental...

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AccendoWave is coming…

We would like to thank all of the wonderful people we have met over the last few weeks, and look forward to working with you during our upcoming pilot tests…

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